Cleopatra’s Needle on Embankment, London

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Cleopatra’s Needle on Embankment, London
golden jubilee

Image by ell brown
This is the Cleopatra’s Needle on Embankment in London (the Victoria Embankment). It is near the Golden Jubilee Bridges (Hungerford Bridge / Hungerford Footbridges).

It was presented to Britain in 1819 by the ruler of Egypt and the Sultan Muhammad Ali in commemoration of the British victories on the Nile and at Alexandria. The British welcomed the gesture, but couldn’t afford to move it at the time.

By 1877, the obelisk was still in Alexandria, when Sir William James Erasmus Wilson sponsered it at £10,000 to transport it to London.

After various problems getting it to London, it finally arrived and was installed on the Victoria Embankment by 1878.

It is flanked by two faux-Egyptian sphinxes, cast from bronze that have hieroglyphic inscriptions that say (in English) "the good god, Thuthmosis III given life". They seem to be looking at the obelisk / Needle rather than protecting it. That’s due to the sphinxes improper or backward installation.

Back of the Magistrate Courts opposite the Childrens Hospital

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Back of the Magistrate Courts opposite the Childrens Hospital
golden jubilee

Image by ell brown
On Steelhouse Lane its the back of the Victoria Law Courts / Birmingham Magistrate Courts.

The Victoria Law Courts is a Grade I listed red brick and terracotta building that now houses the Birmingham Magistrates Court. It was designed by Aston Webb & Ingress Bell of London. It is faced in entirely deep red terracotta from the clay of Ruabon in North Wales.

The foundation stone was laid in 1887 by Queen Victoria, the year of her Golden Jubilee. It was built by Birmingham firm John Bowen and Sons. The court was opened in 1891 by the Prince and Princess of Wales (the future King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra).

The back of the Law Courts is less elaborately decorated.

On the far left is the Children’s Hospital.

The Birmingham Children’s Hospital, the former General Hospital of 1894-7 by William Henman. The original E-shaped plan altered but still recognizable. In the Romanesque style of the Natural History Museum in London. Rich red brick and terracotta. The wings end in pairs of spires with (infilled) triplet arcades between. In the rear corners huge octagonal ventilation towers with spires cut off for tapering open caps. Rebuilt central entrance, now with glass and silver anodized metal porch, part of 1995-8 alterations by Powell Moya Partnership for the Children’s Hospital, which also included operating theatres at the rear.

From Pevsner Architectural Guides: Birmingham by Andy Foster

Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool – plaque – The Queen

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Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool – plaque – The Queen
golden jubilee

Image by ell brown
Some of the objects and art inside Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool.

Some areas you couldn’t use your camera (e.g. the David Hockney exhibition).

The doors were clearly marked for those where you couldn’t use your camera.

These from the areas that you could use for camera.

Plaque unveiled by The Queen during her visit to Walker Gallery during her Golden Jubilee year of 2002.

Cleopatra’s Needle on Embankment, London

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Cleopatra’s Needle on Embankment, London
golden jubilee

Image by ell brown
This is the Cleopatra’s Needle on Embankment in London (the Victoria Embankment). It is near the Golden Jubilee Bridges (Hungerford Bridge / Hungerford Footbridges).

It was presented to Britain in 1819 by the ruler of Egypt and the Sultan Muhammad Ali in commemoration of the British victories on the Nile and at Alexandria. The British welcomed the gesture, but couldn’t afford to move it at the time.

By 1877, the obelisk was still in Alexandria, when Sir William James Erasmus Wilson sponsered it at £10,000 to transport it to London.

After various problems getting it to London, it finally arrived and was installed on the Victoria Embankment by 1878.

It is flanked by two faux-Egyptian sphinxes, cast from bronze that have hieroglyphic inscriptions that say (in English) "the good god, Thuthmosis III given life". They seem to be looking at the obelisk / Needle rather than protecting it. That’s due to the sphinxes improper or backward installation.